Revolutionary War Reenacted At Yorktown's Crompond Elementary School

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The Redcoats lineup at Crompond Elementary's encampment.
The Redcoats lineup at Crompond Elementary's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Dimitri Sywyk plays the Scottish soldiers out at Crompond Elementary's encampment.
Dimitri Sywyk plays the Scottish soldiers out at Crompond Elementary's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Students play the drums at Crompond Elementary's encampment.
Students play the drums at Crompond Elementary's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
Ready to do battle at Crompond Elementary's encampment.
Ready to do battle at Crompond Elementary's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
The Revolutionaries march in formation at Crompond Elementary School's encampment.
The Revolutionaries march in formation at Crompond Elementary School's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
The Indians prepare for battle at Crompond Elementary's encampment.
The Indians prepare for battle at Crompond Elementary's encampment. Photo Credit: Sam Barron

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y. -- Crompond Elementary School turned into a Revolutionary War battlefield on Monday.

For the 12th year in a row, Crompond Elementary School hosted a Revolutionary War Encampment where fourth-grader reenacted the Revolutionary War, which was fought in Yorktown. The event involves 300 students, 75 volunteers and 40 staff members.

The day included students dressed in uniform, marching in ranks, having chicken stew lunch and writing journals home to their parents about what it was like to serve in battle. Students portrayed both revolutionaries and Red Coats along with Native Americans, Hessians, French and Scottish soldiers.

The students learned about the life of a soldier, artillery, fortifications and espionage, with help from storyteller Jonathan Kruk.

"It's going great," Isabella Bravo said. "It's really fun."

Bravo, a history buff, said it was fun to learn about the Revolutionary War this way rather than being in a classroom.

"It's very interesting," Bravo said. "And the food is really good too. It's better than homework. It makes work fun."

Randy Serafin said he also thought this was a better way to learn about the war and loved the food.

John Pastore, a teacher at Crompond, helps organize the event every year. 

"We teach them how to march in regiments and they earn their rank," Pastore said. "We get everyone involved, it's a real collaborative effort."

Pastore said by students living history and being back in 1776, they get more out of the lesson than if they were in a classroom.

"This is something they will never forget," Pastore said. "I've had students tell me years later how much they loved the encampment."

The local aspect of the Revolutionary War also connects with the students. Throughout the day teachers point out how the Revolutionary War literally took place in their backyard.

"It's really cool to see what happened back then," Nicholas Cortino said.

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